Discoveries of Persons in Old Photos Might Occur in Dreams

By Jeannette Holland Austin

Some people are just psychic! Most genealogists have worked for years and years upon their family tree. It is no easy task and requires dedicated attention. Also, our memories of the past are part of the engine which assists in discovering the hidden information concerning our ancestors. Most people do not recall their childhood memories. Perhaps a friend or two. But it seems as though the childhood is a hidden era of our existence so far as recall is concerned. Forgotten memories sometimes appear in dreams while we sleep or emerge suddenly. It happened to me while looking at old b&w photos of some familiar people. The setting was early 1900s on an old farm. Judging by the costumes, my best guess was 1930 or 1940. (Now, if they had an old car or buggy, that would have told me the year). Although the faces were vaguely familiar, their surroundings were not. I knew that my father's people were from the country, but I suspected these persons were on my mother's side of the family. Is there a process for identifying old photos? I do not know, other than the use of common sense. Meanwhile, I stashed that photo inside my head somewhere with the caution to "remember." And it happened. One morning I awoke with the name of my great-grandmother upon my lips. Of course! I was almost eight years of age when she died and this memory found its way to the present from an old photo which I did not recognize! That confirms that our memories are all stashed somewhere waiting for us.

Blood is Thicker than Water

Some Reasons People Emigrated

Tinkling Spring Meeting House

John Preston was the first of his family to come to America from Londonderry, Ireland. His father and uncles were Englishmen who served under King William and aided in the defense of that city when besieged by Roman Catholics commanded by King James in 1689. Preston was a protestant and married a sister of Colonel James Patton of Donnegal and removed with him from Ireland to Virginia during the year of 1740. Colonel Patton had for some years commanded a merchant ship and was a man of property and enterprise. The Colonel obtained an order from the Council from the Governor of Virginia under which he appropriated to himself and associates 120,000 acres of the best lands lying above the Blue Ridge Mountains. When Colonel Patton was killed by Indians at Smithfield in 1753, some of these lands passed on to his descendants. The first Virginia residence of John Preston was "Spring Hill" in Augusta County; thereafter, in 1743 he settled his family upon a tract of land adjoining Staunton on the north side of that town. He died shortly thereafter and was buried at Tinkling Spring Meeting House.

New Additions to North Carolina Pioneers.com

Bertie County Indexes to Deeds 1725-1727; 1727-1739; 1739-1743

Bertie County Images of Wills 1797-1803; 1805-1816

Anson County Images of Wills 1751-1779; 1790-1830; 1801-1812; 1829-1848; 1849-1868

Become a member of 8 Genealogy Websites here



Genealogy at Home

Map of State Records added by GeorgiaPioneers.com

Most State Archives remain closed to the public, and the prospects of opening any time soon appear dim. (I frequently phone to ask). We may be stuck inside, however, genealogists can still research their ancestors online.

Fortunately, Georgia Pioneers is still adding data from microfilm of county records such as Wills, Estates, Marriages etc. to its website. Our most recent additions include the State of Tennessee.

Latest New additions to SoutheasternGenealogy.com

  1. Blount County - Images of Wills 1795-1869; 1896-1922; 1923-1934

  2. Campbell County - Images of Bonds and Administrations 1891-1911; Marriages 1838-1865; 1868-1881; 1881-1889

  3. Claiborne County - Images of Wills, Inventories and Settlements 1812-1814; 1839-1844 (no index); 1855-150; Images of Bonds & Administrations 1878-1899; 1899-1921; Images of Wills 1867-1898; 1870-1892 (no index); Wills & Inventories 1848-1852; General Index to deeds 1801-1850

  4. Carter - Images of Wills 1797-1850; 1850-1920 (no index);1920-1938; Images of Wills 1794 to 1839; 1797-1850 (Missing Pages); Images of Wills 1850-1920 (No Index); Images of Wills 1920-1937; Images of Inventories and Estates 1839-1855; Bonds and Letters of Administration 1876-1924; 1878-1954; Executor Bonds 1954-1969; Bonds 1969-1970; Minutes of the Court 1804-1889; Marriages 1790-1900; Tax Digests, Land Entries, Surveys 1824-1923; Tax Digest 1860-1872

    SoutheasternGenealogy is part of Georgia Pioneers Access to databases in 8 States. Here is where to Join

The Chancery Court Records

Link Correction

Initially, England had a Court of Chancery to handle cases which dealt with the harshness of common law. This same type of court was brought into the American Colonies.

Chancery Court is an element of English law that was brought to the United States in colonial times. The idea of the court of chancery was initially based on separation from circuit courts, whose origins were mainly common law. The role of the court of chancery was to handle those particular cases that could not be resolved in common law courts. This same type of English Law was used in the American Colonies during the colonial period. The cases included guardianships, wills, trusts, contracts, land issues, etc. In essence, the chancery attempted to resolve the small troublesome issues of daily life.

If you are a genealogist who had not found the last will and testament nor estate of your ancestor, this resource offers some hope. You may have noticed “Chancery Notices” in old newspapers. This is where to search. Once you have read the chancery notice, the next step is to locate the actual case in the Chancery Court. Old newspapers can be read online here

Virginia Chancery cases may be found online Most of the colonial wills and estates in Virginia may be found here-members only

New records added to Georgia Pioneers - Images of Wilkes Co. GA Wills 1786-1818; also the General Index to Deeds 1785-1821. Become a Member of Georgia Pioneers

The Chancery Court Could Reveal your Ancestor

Jeannette Holland Austin

Initially, England had a Court of Chancery to handle cases which dealt with the harshness of common law. This same type of court was brought into the American Colonies.

Chancery Court is an element of English law that was brought to the United States in colonial times. The idea of the court of chancery was initially based on separation from circuit courts, whose origins were mainly common law. The role of the court of chancery was to handle those particular cases that could not be resolved in common law courts. This same type of English Law was used in the American Colonies during the colonial period. The cases included guardianships, wills, trusts, contracts, land issues, etc. In essence, the chancery attempted to resolve the small troublesome issues of daily life.

If you are a genealogist who had not found the last will and testament nor estate of your ancestor, this resource offers some hope. You may have noticed “Chancery Notices” in old newspapers. This is where to search. Once you have read the chancery notice, the next step is to locate the actual case in the Chancery Court. Old newspapers can be read online here

Virginia Chancery cases may be found online Most of the colonial wills and estates in Virginia may be found here-members only

New records added to Georgia Pioneers.com - Images of Wilkes Co. GA Wills 1786-1818; also the General Index to Deeds 1785-1821. Become a Member of Georgia Pioneers

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